Cayadutta Tanning
Cayadutta Tanning

Cayadutta Tanning

Cayadutta Tanning

Old abandoned plant

Gloversville (New York), United States

Located in Gloversville near Albany NY, this abandoned factory is ready to crumble. Before 1870, Gloversville was a small village called Stump City. When it became an incorporated village in 1853, the name was changed to Gloversville due to the glove trade being established. In that year, the population was 1,318.

With the coming of the FJ&G railroad in 1870, Gloversville's glove industry boomed, and it became known as the glove Capitol of the World, later the industry adopted the slogan "Gloversville Gloves America", and later the word world was substituted.

Gilbert Shmikler, president of the first company to plead guilty in the military glove, bid-rigging scandal, once owned Cayadutta Tanning Co. He sold the former Harrison Street tannery in Gloversville to Liberty Leather, which declared bankruptcy in the late 1980s.

Shmikler received 60 days in federal prison, a $200,000 fine and was ordered to $100,000 in restitution.

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