Doel, the nuclear ghost town
Doel, the nuclear ghost town

Doel, the nuclear ghost town

Doel, the nuclear ghost town

The mausoleum of the punk street art

Doel, Belgium

We are almost in the Netherlands, but also in the port area of the port of Antwerp in Belgium, first chemical port in Europe.

By the early 60s, the Scheldt marshes are doomed to extinction to be replaced by gigantic docks and the incessant ballet of supertankers on tens of kilometers.

Built on a polder as Doel, the villages of the right bank were the first to be wiped off the map, sometimes leaving a strange trace, like the tower of the Church of Wilmarsdonk, surrounded by mountains of containers.

Located on an area of 150 hectares in the open salt marsh in front of a 15 meters high dike, the village of Doel (pronounced "Dool") was to suffer the same fate. In 1972, Doel has 1300 inhabitants.

The first residents began to desert the village in the 1970s, following the construction of a nuclear power plant located 1 km to the north, which we see the refrigerants from the channel.

It has four reactors which made the headlines in the press because the Belgian nuclear power plants are not among the most stable... Over the years, the city has been abadoned and become today a real playground for all street art artist who come from all around the Europe to draw on these houses, store and other building all around the former city of Doel.

 

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